Channels

Water draining from sand dunes begins to cut channels into the flat surface of a beach. This is somewhat of an optical illusion. If you think the light is coming from the right, then the channels will seem to protrude from the surface. If you think from the left, then the channels appear to cut into the surface, as they actually do. Reid State Park, Maine. Click on the image for a larger view.

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Beach Combing

It was an unusually warm and sunny day in Maine for February. Naomi and I went to Reid State Park to walk along its sand beaches. The images are opposing views from where I was standing. Click on the image for a larger view.

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Waiting for Summer

life_in_maine_waiting_for_summerMaine is quiet in winter—presumably, everyone has gone to Florida. Throughout the State, you can see evidence of the activity that takes place in the summer. These binoculars keep watch on Griffith Head in Reid State Park. Click on the image for a larger view.

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The Soft Edge of the Land

life_in_maine_beachMid-coast Maine is famous for its rocky coastline. The transition between land and sea is hard and clear. Reid State Parks is one of the few places to find a large sand beach. I find this soft edge to the land is mesmerizing. Unlike the unrelenting granite, the beach ebbs and flows with the seasons like a slowly beating heart as the sand is pushed inland in the winter and then moves back toward the sea in the summer. Click on the image for a larger view.

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Seaweed

life_in_maine_seaweedBecause of the mild temperatures this year, much of the coastal seaweed has not been sheared from the rocks with sea ice. Both green and red varieties of this algae we erroneously label a weed—they aren’t plants—grow along the coast. This was taken at Reid State Park. Click on the image for a larger view.