Wild Horses

Carousel on the National Mall in Washington DC is an unlikely symbol of the civil rights movement. On August 28th, 1963, the same day Martin Luther King gave his “I have a Dream” speech, Baltimore’s Gwynn Oak Amusement Park ended its segregation policy after a decade of protest. Charles Langley and his 11-month old daughter Sharon were the first black Americans to ride this carousel, an event documented by reporters. In 1981, this ride was moved to the National Mall and has been open to everyone since then. Click on the image for a larger view.

Water Lilies

A single panel from a triptych by Monet. The last time all three panels were displayed together were in 2011 at the Nelson-Atkins Museum in Kansas City. Monet began these paintings in 1915 and reworked them for over ten years. Their completion date is unknown. Click on the image for a larger view.

Lest We Forget

Lest We Forget is a photographic exhibition of holocaust survivors at the National World War I Memorial in Kansas City. This is the work of the German-Italian photographer and filmmaker Luigi Toscano. He took portraits of almost 400 Holocaust survivors in the United States, Germany, Ukraine, Russia, Israel, Belarus, Austria, and the Netherlands. 70 are presented here on large semi-tranparent panels. The exhibition runs until October 8th. Click on the image for a larger view.