Blue Spruce—Edible Plants

Blue spruce, picea pungens, is native to the Rocky Mountains, but can be found as ornamental trees throughout the United States. The young shoots can be used to make tea high in vitamin C. This bitter, resinous drink is surprisingly refreshing, although it is not uncommon for people to add a sweetener. Click on the image for a larger view.

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News: Tsukiji & Athens Photo Festival

Our latest book Tsukiji: Tokyo Fish Market Suite is now available in our store. You can also read about this book here.

Both Tsukiji: Tokyo Fish Market Suite and Earth, Water, Fire, Wind, Emptiness: Tokyo Landscape were selected for the Photobook Exhibition at Athen Photo Festival 2017. The festival runs from June 14 to July 30 at the Benaki Museum in Athens, Greece.

The Green of Spring

New foliage is so vibrant. Our forest practically glows with the yellow-green of new leaves. Our landscape was so different at the beginning of May. These last two weeks have almost made the grey winter seem like a distant memory. Click on the image for a larger view.

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Spring Ablaze

This weekend was beautiful. The spring foliage is almost complete. Fern carpets our forest floor. When viewed in near infrared, this new world is incandescent. Click on the image for a larger view.

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New Neighbors

I went out to our field last night to see the sunset. To my surprise, two beautiful horses trotted up to me, apparently looking for something to eat. They soon lost interest when they realized I had no food. Click on the image for a larger view.

An Explosion of Green

Our forest has transformed. The top image was taken on May 12th. The middle image was taken on May 15th. On that day, the temperatures reached 70°F. Today was even warmer. That is the last picture. The blue sky is being hidden behind a canopy of green. Click on the image for a larger view.

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Sweet Crab in Bloom

Spring is such an amazing time of year. We have had months of a dry, brown landscape, and then, within a matter of weeks, the landscape transforms. After two days of rain, there was a break in the weather this evening. I went out to see our sweet crab apple tree. Not only do we enjoy its magnificent spring display, in the late summer, we can also harvest its fruit. Click on the image for a larger view.

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Spring Trillium

Red trillium, or wake robin, is appearing on the forest floor. It is one of the first flowers of the season, taking advantage of the light before the foliage returns. Trillium is a striking plant, but its scent of rotting meat is for a slightly different audience. Click on the image for a larger view.

Daylily—Edible Plants

Our daylilies are emerging. While the daylily (hemerocallis fulva) is known as a decorative plant, it is also edible. This time of year we eat the young shoots by stir frying them in soy sauce and serving them on tofu. We harvest the shoots when they are only a few inches long. The ones pictured here would be a little too old. Click on the image for a larger view.

Spring Lights

The spring foliage of young trees in our field. The foliage is white because the image was taken in the near infrared. Chlorophyll is highly reflective in infrared. Click on the image for a larger view.

New Foliage

May is here. We are starting to see this years foliage. The early green is so vibrant compared to the darker greens of summer. These particular trees are in Bates-Morse Mountain Conservation Area in Phippsburg, Maine. Click on the image for a larger view.