After Irma

Hurricane Irma has passed. We were very fortunate not to have sustained any major damage, not everyone in Florida and the Caribbean were so lucky. Irma was only a category 2 storm when it reached us, with sustained winds of around 80 mph. While there may not be much obvious damage, the storm makes significant impact to the environment. Compare the tree in front of our house today with its condition just before Irma arrived yesterday. Notice the loss of foliage in the canopy. Click on the image for a larger view.

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Waiting for Irma

Naomi and I are waiting for Hurricane Irma. The hurricane force winds are expected to arrive within the hour and last for the next twenty four. We have had tornado warnings for most of the day. We are expect to lose power. The weather has certainly been exciting since arriving in Florida. We wish everyone well as this storm passes.  Click on the image for a larger view.

Night Driving, Part 3

The method of photographing lightning by opening the shutter over a period of time allows for images over time to be recorded. Each strike causes an exposure of the landscape to be captured, showing both the passing forest and open pasture. Passing a moving car records the red tail lights across the bottom of the picture. The reflections of our car’s dashboard are reflected in the window. Click on the image for a larger view.

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Night Driving, Part 2

Driving west across central Florida, we headed toward several lightning storms. Since lightning strikes are unpredictable, I had to simply open the shutter for a period of time hoping a strike would occur. Click on the image for a larger view.

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Florida’s Sandhill Cranes

For most of their species, Sandhill Cranes are migratory, heading north in the summer and returning in the winter. Central Florida has a population of non-migratory cranes. These large birds mate for life and can live for over thirty years. They can also become used to humans, although their confidence should not be confused with being harmless or domesticated: they are a wild animal and will protect themselves if felt threatened. Click on the image for a larger view.

Discovering New Places

With unpacking and setting up our new home, Naomi and I have had little time to explore. The other day we took a break from this routine and drove along the Atlantic coast of Florida between Melbourne and Cocoa. While the day did not live up to Florida’s motto of the “Sunshine State,” none the less it was a beautiful day. I suspect the weather kept the beaches empty. Click on the image for a larger view.

Eclipse 2017

Florida experienced a partial eclipse of the sun on August 21, 2017. It is possible to view an eclipse by looking up with special glasses to protect your eyes. You can also look down to see the image of the sun projected through the leaves of a tree. The overlapping leaves and branches create tiny gaps that project an image of the sun on a sidewalk, much in the same way a pinhole camera creates an image. Normally, these images are round—the unobscured disk of the sun. But during an eclipse, a crescent caused by the moon covering the sun is projected.  Continue reading

Witness

One of my favorite things to do in the summer is to lie on my back and watch the sky change. The soft, warm grass adds its scent to the experience. A passerby might conclude that I am doing nothing. But I am a witness to the eternal now, marking the change in the world. Click on the image for a larger view.

Islands of Light, Islands of Life

In visible light, seaweed is dark, like the rock it inhabits. But in the near infrared, seaweed appears white. Water absorbs that same infrared, making the rocks and islands above its surface glow. Click on the image for a larger view.

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Marshall Point

Marshall Point lighthouse and Gunning Rocks off the coast in the Gulf of Maine. Click on the image for a larger view.