Channels

Water draining from sand dunes begins to cut channels into the flat surface of a beach. This is somewhat of an optical illusion. If you think the light is coming from the right, then the channels will seem to protrude from the surface. If you think from the left, then the channels appear to cut into the surface, as they actually do. Reid State Park, Maine. Click on the image for a larger view.

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Beach Combing

It was an unusually warm and sunny day in Maine for February. Naomi and I went to Reid State Park to walk along its sand beaches. The images are opposing views from where I was standing. Click on the image for a larger view.

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Time and Tides

life_in_maine_time_and_tidesMile Beach in Reid State Park. Click on the image for a larger view.

Small Cranberry

life_in_maine_small_cranberrySmall cranberry, Vaccinium oxycoccos, can be found in peat or acidic soils, which gives it its other common name, bog cranberry. This is one of the first plants to colonize burnt bogland and native Americans would burn bogs to stimulate its growth. Like the cultivated cranberry, these are tart. Naturally, this fruit is sought after by wildlife. This plant is on Little Moose Island at the tip of Schoodic peninsular in Acadia National Park. Click on the image for a larger view.

Dog Days of Summer

life_in_maine_dog_daysWe have had a stretch of hot, humid weather. This is tough on Mainers as we don’t have air conditioning to escape the muggy days. Still, knowing what others south of us suffer, it is hard to complain (not that Mainers ever complain, least of all about the weather). Click on the image of Sea Wall Beach in Phippsburg, ME for a larger view.

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Black Rock

life_in_maine_black_rockLooking across Jaquish Gut from Bailey Island. The rock and sea are in shadow with the sky filling in the the surface of the water. Click on the image for a larger view.