Wild Horses

Carousel on the National Mall in Washington DC is an unlikely symbol of the civil rights movement. On August 28th, 1963, the same day Martin Luther King gave his “I have a Dream” speech, Baltimore’s Gwynn Oak Amusement Park ended its segregation policy after a decade of protest. Charles Langley and his 11-month old daughter Sharon were the first black Americans to ride this carousel, an event documented by reporters. In 1981, this ride was moved to the National Mall and has been open to everyone since then. Click on the image for a larger view.

Untitled

Paintings by Mark Rothko in the East Building of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. In this period of his career, Rothko did not title his paintings. Click on the image for a larger view.

D.C. Biker Gangs

While walking to the Jefferson Memorial, I heard loud music approaching me from behind. What I saw was part party, part road race. This group of illuminated cyclists (with the occasional motorized skateboard and scooter) took a couple of minutes to pass because of their numbers, not their speed. I asked one member that had stop by the side of the road if this was some kind of flash mob. His reply? “It is like the fight club, what is done in the fight club, stays in the fight club.” Click on the image for a larger view.